Thursday, May 31, 2012

Floor Pumps: What's Your Favourite?

Lezyne Bicycle Pumps
Occasionally I will hear from readers who are having trouble pumping their own tires, and inevitably the cause ends up being their bicycle pump. Sometimes it is simply a matter of the pump not accommodating their bicycle's valve system and the new cyclist not realising this. Other times, the pump's chuck (the part that fits onto the valve) is difficult to get on and off without causing damage. There are also those who lack sufficient upper body strength to operate their pump effectively. 

As someone who can pump my own tires despite poor upper body strength and poor dexterity, one thing I can say is that the pump matters a great deal. It surprises me how many cyclist initially plan to get by with just the hand-held pump they bought for their tool bag. Floor pumps are much easier to use than hand-held pumps, requiring considerably less effort to operate. 

But not all floor pumps are made equal. At home I use a Pedros Racing Service floor pump and have had no complaints about it over the years. However, this model is no longer in production and I've read mixed reviews about the current Pedro models. I have also tried enough floor pumps to know that some can be difficult and awkward to use. When readers ask for recommendations I am not sure what to suggest.

My general thoughts on what makes a good floor pump are that it ought to: 

. be sufficiently heavy so as to remain stable in use (steel barrel), 
. require a reasonable amount of force to operate, 
. have an accurate pressure gauge, 
. have a dual head to accommodate Presta and Schrader valves, 
. have a chuck that is easy for the average person to fit and remove. 

What is your favourite bicycle floor pump? Recommendations and suggestions are most welcome.

86 comments:

  1. I've been using the same Specialized Airtool Comp going on 6 years. I've only had to replace the seals in the pump head once and it still works flawlessly. Pressure gauge is very accurate and all parts are fully replaceable. The head automatically adjusts to either Presta or Schrader when the locking lever is pulled up and releases cleanly for both valve types. http://www.specialized.com/us/en/ftb/pumps/floorpumps/airtoolcompfloorpump

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    1. I've been using one of these for a year or so, and so far, I like it, for all the reasons listed above. The Presta/Schrader head has been flawless so far, though the flip-up can be a little annoying a times.

      Before that one, I tried several others, and generally got angry with them for one reason or another. I had an old Silca floor pump that worked great until it (somehow) had enough water condense it it for long enough that the cylinder got rusty-nasty and the seals would no longer work. No problems (in my opinion) with the reversible screw-on head -- liked it, though not as convenient as the Airtool.

      Reading below, I see nice words about the Lezyne, and I am curious, because the only portable pump that I have not hated or destroyed is a Lezyne (tore a Quicker Pro clean in half once, that sucked).

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  2. I am interested in what other people say about this, as my floor pump is also a Pedros Racing Service, which replaced a very old Specialized floor pump (hose burst). It saddens me to hear that Pedros model is no longer made, as the one that I have has served me so well over the many years I've had it, that I wouldn't have hesitated to just go out and get another if my current one failed.

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    1. I had an aging Zefal 'Rush'from the 1980's and was able to have the hose replaced by an automotive hose replacement service, using the original end fittings.It worked on very well until the internal seals finally gave up the ghost about 10 years ago.

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  3. My favorite is the Lezyne Classic Floor Drive. I love the wooden handle after break many plastic ones over the years. The action is very smooth unlike many floor pumps. I know this doesn't fit your listed criteria, but I prefer not having a dual head. All my bikes have presta valve and the single head screw on instead of dual head move a plastic lever to "lock on" is much much better and never bends/breaks my presta valves.

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    1. My reasoning for recommending the dual head, is that I know many readers of this blog own bikes with both Presta and Schrader valves.

      I covet the metal & wooden Lezyne, but have been told they take too long to use because of the screw-on chuck. What are you thoughts on that?

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    2. Screw on chuck is effective but tedious. I prefer the ordinary Park Tool home pump PFP-6 - dependable and cheap, like a pump should be.

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    3. I had been using my Lezyne without any trouble until just recently. It does take a while to screw the pump onto the valve but that used to assure that I would not have to readjust to pump the tires. I recently started having problems with the valve tip coming off and releasing all of the air out of the tire when I unscrew the pump. This has happened a couple of time with different tubes and I wonder if anyone has a suggestion as to how to prevent this.

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    4. I have a basic Park floor pump, PFP 4, I think. Not too expensive, not very good, hard to take chuck off, gauge does not seem that accurate. I can't wait to read the rec.s and get a new one!

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    5. I have a Topeak joe blow sport (bright yellow). Not the most pleasing on the eye but good in operation and reasonably priced. Been using it for over 5 years now with no issues. Double headed attachment and have inflated tubs on my TT bike to close on 200 psi.
      KS.

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    6. After having ripped a few valve cores out of their tubes with clamp-on chucks that wouldn't release (and bruised knuckles many times because of the amount of force required), I've been happily using a Lezyne floor pump for a while. The chuck is reversible (presta on one end, schrader on the other), and fairly intuitive. I will say that it really helps to keep the threads greased, so it doesn't become impossible to unscrew it under pressure. Also, it would be nice if the chuck was shaped a bit more like a wing-nut to make it easier to grip and turn when unscrewing it from a valve. Another thing that helps, primarily on small wheels, is threading the hose through spokes on the opposite side of the hub so it's fairly straight as it approaches the valve.

      As for time savings, the only time it's ever bothered me at all was when I had a patch that didn't want to stay on a tube, and I had to re-patch it multiple times, unscrewing and re-attaching the pump each time. The few extra seconds it takes are nothing compared to the time it used to take for the bruises and cuts on my fingers to heal.

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    7. We got some of the Lezyne pumps for the new shop and while I really liked it the way it was(especially the fact that it moves enough air to seat most tubeless tires) everyone else hated the chuck so much I cut them off and installed Silca presta chucks. I'll take the screw on chucks home and put them on something else eventually. I think it makes more sense just to have 2 pumps anyway, one for each type.

      At home I have 2 old Silca floor pumps, one 20 year old (the "new" one) that I dug out of the trash at a shop in PA. (it had a broken plastic handle that I replaced with a wooden one) and an ancient one that must be 50 years old that has a cast brass base, a brass chuck with most of the knurling worn off and a worn out wooden handle that looks like it came off the tiller of a clipper ship. They work fine but I like looking at them so much that if they stopped working I'd probably get some new pump and hide it under the bench when I wasn't using it and leave the Silcas by the bench where I could see them.

      Spindizzy

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    8. WRT the valve cores being pulled out or unthreaded when removing your Lezyne hose from the valve. This is a pretty common problem. I have a small wrench that grabs the top of the valve core, and I tighten all new cores down. Be sure you are grabbing the silver bit and not the brass part that moves up and down to stop up the hole. If I am feeling really proactive I pull the core and add a drop of blue loctite. The newest incarnations of these pumps have a head that allows you to release the pressure a bit at the head as you unscrew, greatly reducing the ability of the head to grab onto the valve core.

      Even with all of that trouble I still like the lezyne pumps. The also have a small adapter that you can screw onto the pump head and use it much like a press on Silca head. This is great if you are pushing air through presta valves most of the time.

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    9. Right!

      The screw on chuck takes a bit of time, but it gives a better connection without having to force the chuck onto the valve. And not having to maneuver and flip a lever is a big help with the small wheels of a Brompton.

      Shaping the chuck a bit like a wing nut, as Merlin suggested, would make the Lezyne pumps even better.

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  4. I use a Silca that I've had for about 10 years. It's all metal and wood. Gauge works well. Presses on to Presta, and threads on to Schrader. Replacement gaskets are cheap and readily available. It looks classic and is nearly bomb-proof. I expect that it's the last bike pump I'll buy.

    It does take slightly longer to air up a Schrader tube, but for two wheels, we're talking less than a minute.

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    1. When I bought my pump, I thought "I'm going to do this right" so I bought a Silca and have never regretted it. A class item that will never let you down.

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    2. Have to endorse the above comments about Silca. I have mine since the early 1980s and have replaced the gaskets several times too. The only thing is that the pressure gauge is no longer accurate after all this time. I replaced it with a SKS Renncompressor but this was a big disappointment as the rubber hose failed as quickly as the valve gasket. I have not been able to source a replacement hose from a local LBS so have now contacted SKS directly about the problem. Any online retailer in the UK that I have found so far that stocks the hose, charges a premium on postage to any non mainland UK address, so they don't get my business. I bought a Joe Blow in the meantime which was much cheaper and works a treat. It gets a lot of use and I have to say I'm impressed with it. Reliable, garish yellow, so not easily lost in the workshop and relatively cheap.

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  5. Peppy (I bite your chuck, I bite it)May 31, 2012 at 10:28 AM

    Just blow into it. Pansies.

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    1. When you let air out of your tires does it smell like anchovy?

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  6. SKS Rennkompressor. Classic, solid, not lightweight. Best with the old valve head.

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    1. I have one of these as well and it's very well built. I think they recently redesigned the head, which now works wonderfully for both presta and schrader. My only issue is that the rubber gasket in the body of the pump that "catches" the air doesn't hold up well and eventually wears out or shrinks. SKS will send you replacement gaskets for free, though (they sent me the new pump head for free too when I asked for a new gasket). I think these pumps used to use a shaped leather gasket that was really hard to wear out as long as it was properly lubricated. Too bad they aren't around anymore.

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    2. there you go: SKS Rennkompressor. First thing i bought when I moved to Germany 22 years ago. A 40 year old design and still the best pump in the world. Not sure why anyone even bothers with anything else :-). That's what Silca was trying to copy when they made their floor pump. I prefer the (newest) two-valve head with the lever, as the rubber gasket in the original brass chuck needs to be replaced every year or so.

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  7. Topeak mega morph, not a floor pump on strict term, but great when you take material with you on holidays (and sorry for my poor english i'm french speaking from belgium)

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    1. I bring a Topeak Road Morph when I'm out. It's pretty good, like a miniature floor pump. It's also nice because if the clamp-on chuck is stuck on the valve, it's possible to disassemble the chuck (that's how it converts between valve types) and get it off without letting all the air out of the tire.

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  8. I've been getting by with my Silca for a number of years. It occasionally misses a stroke; I probably have to install a new pump head. I can't say that it is a joy to use, but it gets the job done. Something curious: the chuck pressure fits over the stems on my Sycip town bike which has tubes with the typical skinny Presta valves but has to be screwed onto the valves on my Bullitt cargobike which has Schwalbe tires (and I suppose Schwalbe tubes) which are fatter. I haven't seen any discussion of the two kinds of Presta valves before. I like screwing the chuck on; it feels more secure that way.

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    1. There is only one type of presta valve, though some are threaded and some are not. There is a dunlop valve, which looks similar to a presta but is the diameter of a schrader. They're very rare in the states but a little more common in europe I think.

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    2. Thanks for the clarification. I have Presta on American bike and Dunlop on the Danish bike, a condition which jives with your statement about Dunlops being popular in Europe but rare in the US. You might find this link to a Chinese valve manufacturer interesting:

      http://www.taiwanvalve.com/pro2.htm

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  9. I've got a serfas fp200 which fits shredder and presto valves. I love the top mounted gauge since it's easier to read. It's a bit heavy which makes it very stable, easy for my 5'4" 120 lb weakling body to pump, and I take a mini pump on rides. Bought it at REI during a sale and, with their permanent warranty, if it ever fails, it goes back for replacement.

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  10. I adore my Lezyne. It seemed like I could never get the lever type heads off the stem without skinning my knuckles on the spokes, and I've wrecked more than one valve stem by pulling the head off at an angle.

    The thread on attachment makes so much sense, I almost can't understand why that isn't the default fastening.

    I'm not a super high pressure connoisseur, but I find the Lezyne to be so much less intimidating and easier to use than others I've had in the past.

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    1. I agree with you 100% about the lever type chucks; I'm always struggling with the lever on my 15-year-old Planet Bike floor pump, particularly on the small wheels of my Brompton and Bike Friday. There's just not a lot of room between the spokes.

      I have a Lezyne mini-pump and imagine I'll be upgrading to a Lezyne floor pump soon.

      I do like that my current bike has a rotating bezel with an indicator arrow on the gauge - this makes it a lot easier to see when I've reached the right pressure.

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    2. No struggling since I began using the L mini a year ago. And last weekend I bought the floor drive which is fitted with the new chuck that has a pressure relief button which eases removal on Presta valves, and also has a press on Presta adapter which I haven't tried yet.

      You'll like having both a floor and a mini pump.

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    3. I've also struggled with the lever chuck on schraeder valves. But once I switched to Schwalbe tubes the problem went away, the chuck comes off nice and easy. It seems valve quality makes a difference. My floor pump is from AIM, a no-name brand sold in Swedish bike shops.

      Fun fact: In Sweden schraeder valves are called "car valve", presta valves are called "racer valve", and dunlop/woods valves are called "bicycle valve".

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  11. Silca Super Pista... the best ever...

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    1. I have a nearly 30 yr old super pista that I just purchased new rubber gaskets for the head. I actually bought a bike shops last leather plunger last time I bought a rubber gasket because I was told you wouldn't be able to find them for long. Sure enough I can't find the leather plungers only plastic ones now! Ironically I still haven't replaced the original leather plunger though, probably why they don't sell them!

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    2. They are still sold at any shop that has a QBP account. And you could probably just call Silca and buy one.

      I ordered one for a customer not last week.

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    3. I have sent an email to silca for a spare part and they have sent me for free!!! great silca!

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  12. Like my Topeak Joe Blow Ace double barrel, three-stage pump with smart head that makes it easy to pump anything!. Heavy, stable, 29" tall, it's my go-to pump out of three that I have. Easy to use. Best price I've seen is at Amazon. Con is that it might be overkill but if you don't want to wrestle with inflating, this is the one. Jim Duncan

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  13. I have an old Blackburn pump -- not sure of the model, they don't make it any more any way. Chuck automatically adjusts to valve type, is pretty easy to use. But on the related question of a pump to carry on a bicycle, I really like the Topeak Road Morph -- it has a foot that unfolds so you can use it like a small floor pump, as well as an integrated gauge. It is far easier to get reasonable pressure in a tire with it than any other hand pump I've tried.

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  14. Topeak Joe Blow for Presta valves. 6 years of near-daily use, one rubber piece replaced (easily sourced; uncommon in the industry these days).

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  15. Don't recall brand I use but always buy middle grade or better at a bike shop and you shouldn't go wrong. I've also used a foot pump which might appeal to those who have a hard time w/arms - not as durable, and available at various sporting goods department (as for air mattresses). PRESSURE GAUGE IS CRITICAL. I always carry a hand pump which is only good for emergencies - you'd be surprised when you've pumped and pumped, then pumped some more, and think tire is hard and you get it home and see only 30 psi on the floor pump gauge! I need to top up rear tire weekly; front not as much.

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  16. I use a Zéfal HP pump. Metal body, wooden handle, should outlast me. The gauge is accurate and one can quickly switch between valve types by unscrewing the valve head and reversing the inner pieces.

    It inflates all my bike tyres, plus the motor bike and car tyres.

    Highly recommended.

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  17. The Lezyne floor pumps do both Presta and Schraeder and the latest models have a relief valve in the head to decompress the line before you remove the head. We have a Steel floor drive in the shop workshop and I have one at home. No compressed seals to be torn by threaded valve stems solid, well built and aesthetically pleasing.

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  18. Silca. Mine is 30 years old and I can still get parts to rebuild it. Works great for Presta, somewhat less friendly for schraeder.

    I actually have two Silca pumps the 30 year old smaller one is here in my office. I recently bought one if their Pista (super?) models that's in the garage at home.

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  19. Good timing with this post! I need to replace my pump and now have a nice list of pumps that everyone has recommended. :)

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  20. I have a basic, no-frills Nashbar "white" floor pump with built-in pressure gauge and dual head with quick-release. I've had no problems in two years of use (for a home fleet of about 10 bikes), and the gauge seems accurate. One minor quibble about the head is that the quick release lever is sometimes difficult to engage on schrader valves, but most of my bikes have presta valves anyway. The main body is steel and the base and handle are plastic. The handle is reinforced and has a nice rubbery tactile feel and is ergonomic and generally comfortable.

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  21. I'd add to your list: repairable.
    I've seen bike shops use pumps that were decades old, that had their hoses, pump valves, etc. overhauled many times.
    Key point: they've been around a long time, and instead of (or in addition to) making new models, they keep repair parts on hand and in the distribution channels. Ask the shop which floor pumps they have spare/repair parts for.

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  22. Had a Topeak Jow Blow Sport that I liked but it started leaking air after a few years. Now I use a Performance Hurricane. It pumps well and the guage is easy to see. It seems to me that whether or not the chuck removes easily after pumping is dependant upon the valve stem as much as the pump. Schwalbe tubes seem to have a broad area with no threads where the chuck clamps down on that makes it very easy to disengage the chuck after pumping. Kenda tubes have a narrower are with two tall threads instead. I have much more trouble removing the chuck from Kenda tubes than Schwalbes.

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  23. I've been using a Blackburn pump for the last couple of years with no issues. Works for either type of head, has the gauge up top for easy reading. I've even used it to pump up the tires on my car (car tires take a lot of air!). I carry a Topeak Road Morph on the bike.

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  24. I have some no name plastic job with a Silca head. Screw on for Schraeder is OK except on the tandem where the 48 spoke wheels mean there is not a lot of room to get at the valve. Did have a nice Silca pump before this but it walked. Never take your good kit to a bike race!

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  25. Favorite pump? The one that is "hidden" in the seat-post of my Dahon Vitesse. It's always with me and the handle is a Brooks saddle!

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  26. While not a "high fashion toney" pump it's hard to beat the honest value found in any pump sold buy Nashbar.com

    I have a "Big Red" Nashbar pump that will inflate my 8,000 # suburban's tires in a flash so bike tires are a walk in the park.

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  27. I have used an all-plastic and double-headed Zefal floor pump for the past twelve years. It has worked flawlessly until now. The only gripe I have with it is that, yes, the head is sometimes difficult to remove, especially with a Schrader valve. However, I have recently found that it helps a lot to rotate the head in and out while pulling away the valve.

    My "dream" pump would be a mix of wood and metal, because of course these materials age much more gracefully than plastic - I have some black plastic covers on my 40 year old bike, and they are the only parts that look as if they are out of time. The texture and shape of plastics sometimes seem so strangely futuristic, even decades later...

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  28. SKS Rennkompressor with a Topeak super chuck:
    http://urbanvelo.org/topeak-brass-super-chuck/

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  29. I use Lezyne classic floor drive pump. It has a white barrel and a wooden handle. Looks so nice I have it in a prominent place at home so I can see it easily. Works very well, too. Long hose, easy to screw on, and fairly easy to unscrew without letting (much) air out with Presta valves. Easy to read pressure gauge, too. For my emergency pump I carry a small Lezyne pump.

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  30. SKS Rennkompressor for me. Very fine German-made pump build to last forever and with replacement parts fr every bit available.

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  31. Silca Pista! It's sturdy, reliable, and can be rebuilt with replacement parts available. I have owned my Silca for 15 years, and it's still going strong!

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  32. i have a hate-hate relationship with bicycle pumps.

    i have yet to find a bike pump where the head does not wear out in a year or two. and invariable by the time the pump wears out there are no replacement heads available.

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  33. I have been using my Silca Pista for over 30 years never a problem. Not sure but the newer ones look to be made cheaper though.

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  34. I have the big Park Tool PFP-4 I like the head on it. It has a large lever that is easy to use if you have weak hands or arthritis. My wife has no problems using it and her hands are on the small side. I run a variety of valves including Woods style :-0 the Park dual head works on all of them.

    Aaron

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  35. What a timely post! Just yesterday I finally got sick of my Planet Bike dual-head pump, which I seldom could fit properly to my Presta valves, so I bought a Lezyne Classic with dual heads. Now I will try to unload the Planet Bike pump on Craigslist, LOL.

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  36. What is your favourite bicycle floor pump? Recommendations and suggestions are most welcome.

    Nashbar Big Red pump.

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  37. At the shop I like the Park Tool pump for road tires (we use an air compressor for MTB/Comfort tires).

    At home, I've been using the same cheap plastic Avenir pump on all my family's bikes for almost ten years.

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  38. The problem with a lot of floor pumps is the pump heads are bulky enough that when you finish pumping up the tire and go to pop them off it is hard to avoid smacking your finger against the nearest spoke.

    At least that is my experience on my 40 spoke wheel city bike.

    A Japanese company, Hrame, used to make a lovely svelte pump head that would be probably have been easier to use. Apparently Hrame stopped making them as the things are nigh impossible to find.

    During Interbike last Fall the blogs were bursting with reports of a soon to be available knock off from EAI. Must have run into a glitch as I've not seen one available yet.

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  39. I'm not sure I would have a favorite per se as I would with beer, or wine or autos or motorcycles or a myriad of other products. That is, I think it's a functional, utilitarian item and I try to find the best I can afford when I'm in the market but don't much care who makes it as long as it works. I've had two so far in my cycling life. The first was and is (rebuilding) a 70s vintage (about 1975) Silca with presta only head and with the orange Columbus tube. The hose is now dried and cracked but I would guess it would still be functional though it's in pieces now. The second is a Blackburn, not sure what model, probably mid to late 90s, with a combination presta/schrader (Italian racing, American mountain and vintage Schwinns) head and has worked fine for the 15 or so years I've used it. I've always like the quality of Blackburn products.

    More importantly, is that I think the floor pump is one of the earliest signals that one is a serious cyclist. Certainly helmets, shoes, gloves and clothing are early buys but when you buy a pump I think it says you are serious about cycling.

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  40. Beware of the Lezyne Micro Floor Drive HP and LP. The plastic hose fittings split and can leave you stranded. We purchased ours probably during the transition from aluminum fittings to plastic. My wife has aluminum fittings my HP had plastic; it split and I walked. I called for a replacement hose and was informed that they were not available. That said the Lezyne road pumps are well thought out, compact and easy to use on either schraeder or presta valves. It's too bad that they had to ruin a good design with plastic parts.

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  41. I have a Lezyne, like the ones in the post's photo (silver with wood handle) and I LOVE it! I used them at bike shops around the city for about year totally lusting after them and finally bought one at the beginning of this year. It is the best pump I've ever used.

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  42. I'm really happy with my Specialized Airtool Pro. Very good construction (aluminum barrel, wide and stable base, large dial, pressure release valve) and easy to use. I like it much better than the Lezyne pumps I had -- I didn't like screwing the head on the valve. I also have a Specialized pump with a Hirame chuck, but I like the Airtool Pro better.

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  43. Silca track pump. 30 years and going strong. I just have to replace the leather washer occasionally.

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  44. I will always remember Dalton Harrow. I met him back in the early 70's and thought of him as the Supreme Cyclist. He was in his 80's at that time and hosted a ride from his house in Norwell once a year on the weekend nearest his birthday, called "The Chowder Ride" I remember him today because instead of a floor pump he had Air Lines coming out of his outside walls like garden hoses at his home. It was a absolutely beautiful antique home that had been built in the late 1700's. What a guy!

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  45. SKS Airbase Pro is the best pump I have every owned or used for pumping up bicycle tires. It is very solid, heavy, and well-built. The parts are warrantied and replaceable. The pressure gauge is on top where it should be. The head was a little tight out of the box, but easily adjusted. Like many good pumps, you want to keep your finger from getting caught between the lever and a spoke when you unhook it, because it does snap open with some force. I just use my thumb to pop it open and keep my fingers out of the way. The SKS Airbase Pro is large, heavy, and made of steel, which makes me think it will last a long time.

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  46. I have the basic Park Tools track pump PFP6 and it isn't that great. I'm actually on my second as the first failed within 6 months and I was given a new one under warranty. I wouldn't recommend it.

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  47. I have a Lezyne Steel Floor Drive like the ones you've pictured and it is absolutely perfect for what I need. I didn't have my own floor pump for a long time so I was always borrowing a whole range of pumps which always had these chucks that had some sort of clamp you had to switch. I nearly always pinched a finger or had to fuss much to long.
    When I bought my own pump I was drawn to Lezyne for their clean no-nonsense design, but sold by the simplicity and durability of their mechanics. There's nothing fancy going on here, just solid design from solid materials. (and also surprisingly easier to pump then anything else I've used!)

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  48. +1 for the SKS Rennkompressor. Have not had a pump that rock solid and long lasting as this one. It is doesn't pump as much air as others per stroke but it actually goes up to higher pressures without getting to hard to pump. The gauge seems pretty accurate to me but I did never double check it with another gauge. In my opinion the best head you can get with it is the brass one that is just for Presta valves.It is easy, long lasting, tight and fast.
    I even pimped my Rennkompressor with a oak layer on the pipe itself and fingermolds on the handle.

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  49. I have an older (10+ years) Blackburn TP-3. It wouldn't say it is my favorite but it works well. It had an awful chuck when I bought it - the flip locking mechanism could snap your fingers when releasing it. The chuck failed and I walked into Ace and they just handed me a new one, which I have had for most of the time I have had the pump and it is very easy and safe to use and is reliable. It is dual head, which is helpful for strollers, balance bikes, child trailers, and wheelbarrows, all of which have Schrader valves. It has a steel barrel but not wooden handles.

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  50. Haven't read all the comments but I hope it's been reminded that pumps require maintenance in order to last. Which ever pump one has it's life can be extended by keeping it lubricated.

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  51. I've been using a Silca for about 6 years. Back in December I bought a Lezyne Classic Floor Drive pump. I haven't used the Silca once since. No more bruised knuckles.

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  52. Wow, thanks so much for the helpful comments everybody. I've been thinking of getting a second floor pump, to keep at my studio, and might give the Silca a try based on some of the reports here. I love the look and feel of the Lezyne, but I suspect the screw-on chuck will frustrate me.

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    1. Velouria this is the best chuck I ever own: Silca #30 http://www.silcapompe.it/pop_30.htm

      is perfect for presta and schrader... I've tried many and many chuck, but Silca #30 is the best...

      I use it for my road bike with tubular tyres (10bar) and is perfect also for my Brompton schrader valve...

      also SKS eva chuck is very very good:
      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-fj2rQvm9AFU/TdOChQ-ldTI/AAAAAAAAEUY/5jxVWQsWohU/s1600/IMG_5895.JPG

      but I don't like how it looks on my Silca superpista... ;)

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  53. One more vote for the Rennkompressor...

    I grew using Silca track pumps and they are lovely. Those were the only quality floor pumps we knew of in the USA. Here in the Netherlands nobody's ever seen one so when my 40 year old Silca needed another rebuild a decade ago I gave in and got the local standard... The SKS Rennkompressor.

    As much emotional attachment I have to the Silcas I have to admit that the SKS is a better pump in every regard except for the chuck. Silca's is better but knife and a hose clamp will fix that in a couple moments.

    The Silca is typically Italian:
    pretty, essentially durable but requires a bit of fussing and maintenance, and my gauges never worked for crap. The handle is nice and compact but not comfortable when you've got ten track wheels to pump to ten bar. The plastic caps come loose so I added a screw. The base is too small to stand on its own and mine eventually broke (OK, after maybe 20 years of daily use and travel).

    The SKS Rennkompressor is typically German:
    rock solid, comfortable, never needs attention, and totally boring to look at and hold.

    Both will squeeze air into your tires for the rest of your life and parts will always be available. All of the other options, no matter how fancy, are disposables.

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  54. I've had a lot of pumps and they seem to be one of the few things the R&D guys redesign more frequently than bicycles themselves. I recently had a conversation with a bike shop employee who concurred with me that there had recently been a long stretch where all the new pumps put out by the big brands were prone to failure. That combined with frequent model changes means you have to buy a new pump rather than purchase a little part when the pump wears out or breaks.

    I was thrilled to find a $20 Schwinn floor pump at target that fits all your criteria and it has lasted a good several years now with no problems. If it does break, its still half the price of the one's in the bike shop. I use it with schrader and presta valve tires at pressures up to 120 psi.

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  55. How much chuck can a pump chuck chuck?

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  56. A late 70s Silca floor pump that keeps on working and is easily serviced. The last service was replacing the hose with something appropriately sized from an automotive supply shop. I also use Silca frame-fit pumps and Zefal-HP, the latter having been found by the side of the road and now adorns my Surly. I've also used CO-two cartridges but don't use 'em anylonger because they're throw-away nature.

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  57. I just bought a Topeak JoeBlow Sport 2 at Performance for like 26 bucks. It's not the most attractive thing but it does the job admirably -- better than the Zefal HP I had for years. The Topeak doesn't tip over constantly, and Topeak's dual chuck is the best -- a great upgrade for other pumps.

    Honorable mention also to my Barbieri CarbOne mini-pump. It will indeed pump to over 100psi, even if it takes over 300 strokes. It weighs practically nothing and will fit any bike, clipped alongside a water bottle cage.

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