Thursday, March 22, 2012

Dream Wool Cycling Jersey Concept

Wool Jersey, Front and Rear Views
A number of manufacturers have come out with updated versions of the classic wool roadcycling jersey over the past few years, and I've accumulated a few. All have some nice features, but none are perfect. Yesterday I noticed one that I think might come close, and exchanged some emails with my Ibex contact Julie lamenting that there is no women's version. This ended with the people at Ibex saying they will consider it for Fall 2012, which, in turn, inspired me to be more specific about what I envisioned. This is not directed at Ibex necessarily, but at wool manufacturers in general. It is a simple concept, and shouldn't be difficult to execute - yet no jersey quite like this exists at the moment as far as I know.

Lightweight merino or merino/lycra blend; no polyester
The key to my dream wool cycling jersey is a very lightweight merino fabric. And by lightweight I mean summer weight, t-shirt weight. The wool Swobo and Woolistic use for their jerseys is too heavy. Rapha, Road Holland and Shutt Velo Rapide use "sport wool," which is a wool/polyester blend that, for me at least, works nicely over a base layer in cold temps, but not against bare skin. Icebreaker adds a touch of lycra to their paper-thin wool jerseys for stretch, and I like their fabric as a possibility. But the nicest I've worn so far has been the 18.5 micron, 195g/m2 merino used by Ibex for their Indie line of jerseys. That fabric feels pretty much spot on.

No Seams Dividing SleevesI prefer cycling jerseys with long sleeves, even in summer, because this way my arms don't get burned. Also, if the fabric is lightweight enough, I actually find it more comfortable to have my skin covered in the heat than not. The combination of the t-shirt weight wool and the long sleeve length is perfect for temperature regulation on both hot and cool days. One thing to add here, is that I beg whoever makes this jersey to not do anything crazy to the sleeves - like what Swobo did here by adding seams. I have both the older (no seams) and the newer (seams! why?) versions of their long sleeve jersey, and the seams on the newer one make the sleeves constricting. Please just leave the sleeves be; they don't need reinventing.

2-Way Zipper
One feature I would absolutely love to see in a cycling jersey is a 2-way zipper. I think this would be an especially useful feature for women, as it would enable us to unzip the jersey for extra ventilation just like men do, but without exposing the bosom. With a 2-way zipper we can unzip along the tummy and leave the chest covered up. I am surprised no one has tried this yet actually. The zipper should be covered on the inside of the jersey, so that it doesn't come into contact with the skin.

Shaping darts, for Bosom
Women sometimes complain that cycling jerseys are unflattering, and one way to remedy this would be to tailor the jersey via shaping darts - which Ibex already does in some of their athletic tops. However, I am reluctant to suggest this, because it does introduce additional seams which for some may cause chafing. Personally I am okay with or without darted tailoring, though a women-specific fit would be nice.

3 Classic Rear Pockets
In the back, all I want is the classic 3 jersey pockets, elasticized at the top. No more or no less; no bells and whistles; nothing weird. Some manufacturers have been getting clever with the pockets - adding all sorts of secret zip-up compartments for pumps and wallets, which I really feel is unnecessary, and if anything, limits the use of that potentially vast pocket space. Just the standard 3 pockets please!

Wool Cycling Jersey, Front
As far as looks, I am open - just please keep it simple. No flowers, no swirly shapes, no faux-oriental designs, and no clever slogans. Classic colours. Maybe a stipe or two somewhere, with room for embroidering a club name across the chest and back. I love this colourscheme from Ibex, and these from Rapha (sans prominent logo), and this one from Shutt Velo Rapide - and of course these vintage beauties from Bridgestone. Less is more, and a couple of contrasting stripes go a long way.

Wool Cycling Jersey, Rear
I have not described anything complicated here, and I hope manufacturers reading this will consider producing something like it. Ibex is probably in the best position to do it, because they already have the perfect fabric and a design that comes very close. But I'd love to see more options for lightweight, women-specific wool cycling jerseys across the board. Your thoughts and input are, of course, welcome. Who knows, maybe we can make something happen.

56 comments:

  1. Thanks for the heads up on the Ibex men's jersey. I like Swobo a lot and wear them year round, but could go even lighter weight. Not sure I like the contrasting shoulder panels though.

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  2. Great idea V!

    I sew my own clothes (as a hobby) and am dying to make myself a jersey if I could swing it. All my wool jerseys now are OK, but not fantastic. Patagonia should perhaps look into a cycling a jersey with some of their wonderful base layer wools. I have some women specific (and male) Nike wool jerseys that almost match your sketch exactly - and they don't make them anymore. I tend to agree with you - more lightweight's women's soft merino full zip jerseys with back pockets, please.

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    1. Pammie--

      I've been buying used lightweight merino sweaters at thrift stores to make jerseys for myself and my husband (and throwing some up on Etsy now, too). It's cheaper and way more fun than buying yards of merino fabric, which can be super hard to find retail, anyway.

      I love your blog, btw. I'm always so impressed with people who dive into making pants!

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    2. Thanks Jessie! Great idea about the merino! I was going to look at Mood but I suspect it's wicket expensive! I'm going to do it - Thanks so much again for the tip (I live in thift store heaven in Ventura).

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    3. Your jerseys on Etsy look very nice! I'm amazed, though, that you're able to find merino sweaters at a thrift store. I don't think I've ever seen one at my LTS (local thrift store).

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    4. Jessie, those are beautiful!

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  3. And, continuing that thought . . . the link below is a women's jersey pattern (# 401) but can be made out of knit as well - so I think a merino wool would work - adding full zip!
    http://www.thegreenpepper.com/adults.html?id=uu9ZNcw3
    But I would love to have a nice selection to choose from manufacturers.

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  4. NO GIRLY DESIGNS. I'm so with you there. No flowers, no swirly stuff, no hot pink. Light blue and light green are excellent options for a long-sleeved summerweight jersey.

    My Icebreaker short-sleeved jerseys are made from two fabrics--a normal thin one, and one that's just a step away from mesh for the armpits etc. I really like that.

    A two-way zipper is a genius idea.

    I like long sleeves with thumb holes, because it makes it easier to layer form-fitting clothes and covers the wrists, but the material has to be stretchy enough that it won't be weird or awkward to fold/push them back when I have cycling gloves on.

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    1. I like the mesh Icebreaker uses also, but they seem to have either discontinued those or no longer offer them as cycling jerseys, only running. The current lineup of their cycling jerseys have these weird graphics, no mesh, and are short sleeve or sleeveless only.

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    2. I just looked, and you're right, what a bummer. Also, the zipper no longer goes all the way to the top of the collar! That's really irritating....I had to keep my jersey zipped up all the way some days while touring or bugs flew down my shirt and collected in my bra. Bleh.

      I just realized that I had no idea their jerseys were so expensive. I've only ever bought anything from them at their warehouse sales here in Portland, I paid $5 for one jersey because it had a stain and the other was $30. I think they're meant more for mountain biking, they don't have those big rear pockets, just a tiny one on the side that I used for lip balm.

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  5. I also burn easily so I think the combination of long-sleeves + light-weight is brilliant!

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  6. OT but where do you buy Swobo jerseys? They are always sold out.

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    1. There is a discount website called Department of Goods. I've bought 3 Swobo jerseys there over the years, for around $30 each. You have to stalk them, but really good stuff comes up.

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  7. Yes! I completely agree with your wish list, but would like to also add -- fit. I know no manufacturer can please everyone, but I'll chime in anyway.

    Fit for women who are not shaped like pencils. The trouble I have with most jerseys is they are too tight in the arms (I lift weights) and across my lower midsection (a result of child bearing). By the time I find a size that will accomodate those areas, I'm wearing a tent.

    Another point -- I would gladly spend some extra $$ to get one good quality jersey instead of several "eh" jerseys just to get by. :)

    Anne in Geneva, IL

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  8. +1 on everything about your post plus another +1 to Anne in Geneva on upper arms & lower torso. And thanks for the departmentofgoods.com tip! :)

    Also - I believe I saw you say somewhere that you're waiting for a Nau jacket to review. Any chance it's this one? http://www.nau.com/womens/categories/jackets/dualist-jacket-014W02.html I've been dying for some firsthand feedback on that one - I just haven't had the courage to take the plunge sight unseen for that much money and the bother of having it delivered to my sister in Oregon for her to ship on to me in the UK.

    Thanks - again, this post is spot on. We really need more well-designed womens-specific merino options!

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    1. I can weigh in on the men's version. I picked up a (very lightly) used one on eBay last fall and wore it almost daily until the recent warm spell here in Ontario when I haven't even needed a jacket.

      It worked great on its own for temperatures a little above freezing; in colder weather I'd either put on a fleece sweater underneath it or a heavier jacket on top, and that worked down to about 0 Fahrenheit. On the rare occasions it got colder than that this winter, I didn't bother trying to layer even more clothing and just put my heavy winter coat over whatever shirt I was wearing indoors.

      The polyester outer layer on the front works well to block wind and light rain, but the back soaks through pretty quickly if it gets wet, so I wear a thin rain jacket on top in wet weather. The wool is quite soft and comfortable, and it still shows hardly any sign of wear. I won't bother to say anything about the fit, since it would be pretty meaningless to you, except that it works for me, both on and off my bike.

      So I'm very happy with the jacket overall, though I was lucky to get such a new-looking one for quite a bit less than the $280 listed on the website.

      Mike

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    2. The Nau jacket I have is last year's version of this one and not the one you're interested in, sorry!

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  9. I agree, Ibex Indie fabric is topnotch for jersey's. I have the short sleeve urban indie, which I love. Don't really care for the 3 pocket design (and I've had many of these over the years) - seems like a vestigial feature harking back to stage racing - also, they bag and sag very easily.

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  10. i have a few mens pieces from ibex and they are fantastic.
    the best part is that most of their stuff is responsibly made in the US, and it appears that they are going to bring back all production to the US this year.

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    1. "it appears that [Ibex] are going to bring back all production to the US this year"

      I was just reading about that. Great news.

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  11. Love this design and I suspect that if anyone could pull this off, Ibex could. I am a huge fan of their products and yes--of the fact that you can wander from the men's to the women's sections of the store without hitting a wall of pink and mauve and other "girly" colors.

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  12. I'm a guy who works in a bike shop a day a week, who used to be in the wholesale garment manufacturing and embroidery business, who is now stay home dad/artist. I could not agree more with EVERY point you have made. I cannot stand the horrible tendency of adding to, embellishing, and reinventing something till it just plain misses the point. I hope this vision is seen and taken seriously. Great post!!

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    1. This is not a response to Brad - Blogger is just screwing up again.

      imHONESTo darts are superfluous when the entire thing stretches anyway. Also the most functional jersey is one that fits closely, which means living with "unflattering".

      I used to wear ls jersies in the summer and would have welcomed these, but really a ss jersey with arm coolers is what I wear now and is much more versatile. For you two pieces of wool with the option of taking off the sleeves in overcast, humid weather. Mfgs. can deal with that, but the market for full long sleeves in wool is somewhat limited, as with mixtes.

      That is my Lecture of the Day.

      p.s. the entire hidden micro pocket thing with oddly-shaped jersey pocket thing is a concession to style. The standard jersey with a full-length zip is a near-perfect design already.

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    2. Darts and princess seams are useful for those of us who have a large discrepancy between waist/hips and chest measurements. A thin, stretchy fabric that fits well at my waist can be very snug and revealing, not to mention stretched to the point of translucence. Form-fitting doesn't necessarily have to mean unflattering. Plus, a proper fit means that everything moves with me, while also staying in place.

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    3. Personally I do not really need darts, but a woman who is 36D with a 26" waist will likely see things differently. How can a jersey fit her closely without either being loose in the abdomen or constricting around the chest? For some figures, stretch alone is not enough.

      "Living with unflattering..." - that's easy for you to say, being a skinny guy! Everything looks fine on you people. The truth is, people enjoy themselves more if they don't look horrible, so why not make flattering clothing for those who spend much of their lives on a bike?

      CJ - I really don't mean to be pushing Ibex so much, but it's hard not to if you've seen how expertly tailored some of their women's tops are; I'd try one of their women's jerseys from the "Indie" line if you haven't already.

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    4. Going through Mrs. GR's things I see one jersey with boob darts. She has them. Boobs, I mean. Others fit kind of tight there, none are unflattering but I can see how they might be. The uniboob might be an example.

      I think the difference in styles comes down to club cut versus race cut. Other thing is if the jersey is too loose in the waist the stuff in the pockets can move around more.

      As far as living with unflattering - try walking into a deli in some far flung place with your, if you had one, package at eye level with conservative moms eyes abulging. Someone needs to design some sort of manssiere codpiece. With darts.

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    5. GRJ, the seamstress part of my brain is trying to envision the proper shaping for such a garment - darts, gathers, gussets?

      V, I just received an Ibex "indie" jersey in the mail last week, and it is definitely the best fitting of all of my jerseys. The princess seams work well for me. I had to take in the waist in a couple of my other jerseys for them to fit properly, but the Ibex fits well.

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    6. CJ, do what you have to do, just hide the turret.

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    7. This is why the Co-Habitant won't wear cycling shorts; doesn't want to be treated like eye-candy.

      Package darts/ codpiece... sounds like a tailor's nightmare, albeit a hilarious one.

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    8. I solved the problem by getting some very light running shorts, ripping out the lining and wearing them over. Cuts down on the excess material of "normal" shorts.

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  13. Not the lightweight material that you want for summer, but for cool-weather riding let me put in a word for Wabi Woolens.

    http://wabiwoolens.com/

    Small company, USA-made, no holds barred quality, top-quality wool, intelligent design, muted colors.

    Probably best for men, too, but I know men read this blog. No personal interest in WW except as a very satisfied customer.

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  14. I'm glad you brought this up. I am a huge fan of wool and would love to see more women specific silhouettes offered. If there was a demand for form fitting tops - I hope the pattern makers consider the smaller proportions of the petite set. I typically stay away from cycling specific wool garments since they rarely fit. Instead I look for second hand wool sweaters, make necessary alterations, and slap on a few pockets.

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  15. Take a look at the Saint James Matelot and Pont Raye sailor sweaters. Archival Clothing stocks them. The knit used is the closest extant version of the fabric used in classic Gianni and St. Raphael jerseys. The knit allows the garment to drape well over more body types than would seem possible. St. James makes both mens and womens but Gianni never did and a lot of women used those jerseys and loved them.

    If you like the Bridgestone shoulder buttons and Bridgestone quality you would swoon for St. James. Mine is over 40 years old, has been worn hundreds and hundreds of times, is still soft and beautiful. It will outlast me. Never had an actual cycling jersey quite so good.

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    1. They look lovely. But I for one want CYCLING-specific womens clothing. Those necklines (and the way the fabric over the shoulders and upper back will inevitably bunch up) are impossibly uncomfortable after 5 minutes in an agreessive roadbike position... much less on an all-day ride... much less on a multi-day tour... which is where merino really comes into its own.

      I confess, I am currently obsessing over the lack of top performing jerseys in my wardrobe in view of my upcoming cycle ride from London to John O'Groats...

      V, can we bring your Dream Jersey into production NOW please? :)

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    2. I love those sweaters from Archival Clothing and the shoulder buttons on the Bridgestone jerseys, but agree with Rebacca that those are not sufficiently lightweight or roadcycling-specific. I was using Bridgestone only as an example of the colour scheme; I believe those specific jerseys were for cold weather and for their MTB team. That said, the Archival Clothing website is generally swoonworthy. If I could, I would get most of my wardrobe from them.

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  16. I love my Castelli merino sweater with full zipper.. it's just way heavier than what you describe. It has long sleeves, basic pockets and metal zipper, nice colors. Washes well too.

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  17. "Never had an actual cycling jersey quite so good."

    This is what we're talking about. The makers of cyling jerseys need to raise their game!

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    1. Quite right they should raise their game. Pricey as St. James sweaters are high-end wool jerseys are priced just as high while offering less value.

      The St. James of course has no pockets. Don't know what discomfort you might be thinking of. I've done many cold weather centuries in mine.

      My real reason for bringing it up at all was the fabric. And how it drapes and shapes. Making such things as darts irrelevant. As sold the specific fabric is too heavy and too loosely knit to be a dedicated cycling item. But then if you saw a wool jersey from the 50s or 60s you might be surprised how heavy it was. The European climate was much cooler.

      Ibex makes wonderful products. Criticising them much is beside the point. There have however been much much better products. Anyone who's come to cycling in recent years just could not know that. Vintage Gianni jerseys do come up for sale, the NOS ones are very very high. The successor company, Castelli, occasionally does limited runs of fairly nice woolens, they are not the same.

      Just a few weeks back I picked up a pair of De Marchi wool jerseys NOS from the early 90s for $15 each. Size 1 jerseys. From a Massachusetts bike shop actually. The better half, who is even more demanding than I, promptly announced she had not seen the quality in 40 years. No reason it cannot be done now. They've dropped their game.

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  18. "...and of course these vintage beauties from Bridgestone"

    You know, just because those guys are older than you doesn't give you the right to call them "vintage." Not very nice at all!

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    1. That's very cute. I'm on the one on the left. Funny thing is, Sky is only 3-4 years older than Velouria, and as for me, I'm timeless and ageless! But I can certainly imagine some would assume that we are much older than we are since we dress with such style and elegance.

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    2. : )

      I see that picture is from 2006, so at the time it was taken "even" you were only a few years older than I am now.

      But age, like beauty, is only in our heads anyhow.

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  19. Re: the zipper covered on the inside: PREACH. I don't know why, even on expensive jerseys, manufacturers leave the inside seams and zippers "raw". I think every jersey I have has these sorts of spots that are itchy and unpleasant on bare skin. If I'm shelling out $50, $100 on a jersey, I don't want to itch or chafe.

    I'm also a fan of the three-pocket design, though I have a jersey that has an additional mini zippered pocket on the outside of the middle pocket that is perfect for ID/cash, which I love. Again, I'm not sure what manufacturers are thinking when they omit pockets or try for some weird single-pocket kangaroo thing.

    Also with you on the design. No flowers, excessive pastels, etc. Keep it simple. Just because I'm a girl doesn't mean I want to ride around looking like some kind of Laura Ashley-meets-Ed Hardy nightmare.

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  20. The ONLY reservation I would have about this design is that the wool being lightweight may not be able to support much weight in the rear pockets without going al stretchy. Otherwise a great design!
    The last two or three comments I have tried to post (on other posts) have not gone up BTW, blogspot would not let me put them up ...
    Vicki

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    1. Yes bloodspot is acting up again : (

      They already make jerseys out of this lightweight material, and the pockets seem fine, so I don't think it would be a problem. Swobo adds elastics to the tops of the pockets, which is the best solution IMO.

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  21. Velouria, it sounds as though you and I have very similar requirements for our ideal wool jerseys (except I am a big fan of the small, zippered pocket in the rear). Making one of the fabric you describe is troublesome, however, because that is a jersey knit which will not prove to be very durable - it is thin and runs easily after small tears, plus it has a great amount of stretch and will sag with weight in the pockets. Wabi Woolens makes a Sport Series jersey with lightweight fabric, simple design and construction, and it is made in the US. The women's version is not yet done, but the prototypes I have do not use darts, yet still give some shape to the body. Two-way zipper is under consideration.
    Cheers,
    Harth
    www.wabiwoolens.com

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    1. "Making one of the fabric you describe is troublesome, however, because that is a jersey knit which will not prove to be very durable - it is thin and runs easily after small tears, plus it has a great amount of stretch and will sag with weight in the pockets."

      V (and others) can attest that this is NOT the case with Ibex, which is the brand clearly identified in V's post as being nearly ideal. So I don't know where you're coming from with these criticisms, other than (dare I say it?) to create an opportunity to tout your own product? Bring it on - the more choices the better! But dissatisfaction with Ibex's fabric is not the root cause of this post.

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    2. Hi Rebecca,
      I don't see where I criticize Ibex in my comments. In fact, I am wearing Ibex right now and wear Ibex shorts and knickers regularly when I ride. I love Ibex and I am thankful they exist (as is my wife).
      Velouria described a very lightweight fabric, which I interpreted as a jersey knit fabric, and I don't believe such fabric is ideal for a cycling jersey (despite the name of the knit) for the reasons I stated. I honestly do not know what type of knit Ibex uses for all of their jerseys.
      As for taking the opportunity to "tout your own product," that is exactly what I was doing, but only because I found her description of her ideal jersey was very similar to the jerseys I make in many ways. I wasn't stating mine are best, or even better than Ibex, I just thought it was worth mentioning that Wabi Woolens exists because of the similarities to her description.
      Harth

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    3. Firstly I just want to clarify that it is absolutely fine for manufacturers to promote their products in the comments when doing so is relevant to the post.

      I've heard good things about Wabi Woolens, but have not tried the jerseys myself.

      Ibex makes a number of cycling jerseys and they use different fabrics for them. The one I like is the Indie fabric, which is a 18.5 micron, 195g/m2 merino that feels exceptionally nice. They've been making cycling jerseys out of this fabric for a few years now, and I have not heard of durability being an issue.

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  22. Not sure if anyone has suggested some sort of iPhone/ mp3 player pocket with some sort of headphone wire channel integrated.

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  23. Do you know about Alchemist Wool? I meet Claire, a rep, last year at the bike expo at the Somerville Armory (actually saw you there, too) and met with Jeff, the owner, when I was visiting in Boulder. I bought a jersey from him directly... and he delivered it by bicycle! I believe they do custom work, let me know if you'd like me to put you in touch with them.
    http://teamalchemist.com/
    -S

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  24. I, too, am sick of swirlies and hibiscus flowers on everything made for women. You know, just in case you couldn't already tell that it's made for women.

    I have taken to learning how to sew specifically to tailor mens' gear to my body. I'm cheap, so I often use second hand gear, including hand-me-downs form my boyfriend. It's surprisingly easy it designs with separated side panels (cut them out and sew the remaining seams together), and given that the fabrics are stretchy, sometimes all I have to do is take in a side seam.
    heavier garments like jackets do require darts like you said, and it gets a little more complicated when it comes to taking in shoulders and when there are back pockets, but it is rewarding if you have the time and inclination.

    Now that I have a serger, I have graduated to buying very very large-sized knit merino garments off of ebay and turning them into simple, well-fitted cycling garments for myself. I don't particularly enjoy sewing but the market is so bad that I have no choice if I want to look decent.

    Bolero-type sweaters are great for protecting the arms in the summer!

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  25. Just have to say that I received my Ibex Indie jersey in neptune this afternoon (referenced above and ordered after seeing your post) and it is a dream jersey especially in its fit and construction details and the light weight or t-shirt weight as you described it. Also ordered the Rapha Club Jersey in cream after reading this article. What's humbling is that I've pored over the Ibex site many times and would never have picked this item nor the Rapha item for that matter except for your article (no idea why I don't pick up on these items on my own-some of us are just challenged I guess). Thanks!
    Jim Duncan

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    1. I received the men's in small for review and love it also, though it's a little too big on me. I can wear it, but I prefer a tighter fit; might look into altering it. Glad you like it though!

      The Rapha club jersey is handsome, and I have a club-customised version of it. Unfortunately, I just don't like the feel of that sportwool stuff against bare skin; I wore it in 85deg temps and it was yucky. Over a thin wool base layer it is very nice though.

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  26. Have you seen the jerseys by Oregon Cyclewear?

    The wool is a bit thicker than what you have in mind, but they tick lots of boxes for me - they used to have one that zipped all the way up the front, but I'm not sure if it's been discontinued or not....

    Otherwise - good classic colours, 100% wool, simple back pockets, no girly crap, embroidery options. tick.

    Only issue I have is that they don't make XS sizes for smaller women, which is a huge pity. I'm a skinny bitch, and the small size is huge on me, which is a bugger. I have campaigned a little for XS in all styles, but to no effect just yet. I shall persevere.

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  27. Hi Velouria,

    Full disclosure: I am a somewhat interested party here. Cima Coppi Cyclewear is made and designed by Lawrence, my Co-Habitant, but also the owner, designer, sewer, blogger and bike lover at a small wool cyclewear producer in Vancouver, Canada -- think a one-man band playing sewing machines, sergers and embroiderers... while on a bike. My only contributions are acting as the "guinea pig" for the women's line, and providing input on women specific fitting. As a rookie bike tourer and road cyclist myself, I can definitely see the value on the design you are proposing -- I actually never thought of the double side zipper, but the more I think about it, the more interesting I find it!

    I feel the jersey you describe falls very close between his classic jerseys, with women specific cut, and his women cycling jacket (http://cimacoppi.bigcartel.com/product/handmade-reclaimed-wool-women-s-podium-jacket). He stocks both 100% new merino wool and some reclaimed wool, which usually has a small percentage of nylon on it (he actually also started out the business by using second hand merino jerseys, although has now moved away from it to be able to fulfill custom team orders). He does custom work, so it would be no problem to order a lighter weight wool and work out a design such as the one you are describing.

    If interested, drop a line at custom@cimacoppi.ca. I am sure he could make something like this happen. I am anyways taking note of some of your ideas here, such as the zipper. I may push for that feature on my next jersey!! ;)

    cimacoppi.ca
    cimacoppi.bigcartel.com
    cimacoppirides.wordpress.com

    Wishing death to all swirls, flowers and pink details,

    Patricia

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  28. FWIW, liked the neptune jersey you reviewed so well, I received tonight their short sleeve Indie S/S version in same color with contrasting Ibex Indie arm warmers in same weight wool as jersey. Know you don't like short sleeves and maybe not arm warmers either but this is a way that I can extend my enjoyment of these jerseys. The short sleeve jersey fits a little snugger than the full zip. The XS arm warmers are perfect solution for me as the usual small is too loose. BTW, got the Rapha wind jacket also tonight and it looks like it might be a winner. Thanks again. Jim Duncan

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