Saturday, January 30, 2010

Royal H. Mixte Logos

Some of you have asked what the decals on my Royal H. mixte will look like, and I now have pictures. But there won't actually be any decals: the logos are being painted (stenciled) by hand, by Circle A in Providence, RI. I chose these designs out of many that were available, because I thought the aesthetic would suit my bicycle very nicely.

So this is what the downtube logo will look like:


And this is what the headtube logo will look like:

The image may seem a little strange in .jpg form, but on an actual head tube it looks ridiculously beautiful - like an expressionist woodblock print. I remember stopping in my tracks the first time I saw this design on another Royal H. bike, and thinking "I want THAT". Eventually I will get a headbadge made and attach it over the logo, but for now it will be painted. (Meanwhile, if you are a headbadge maker, do drop me a line - especially if you are local.)

The logos will be done in a dark gold (more like a bronze or copper) over the sage green frame. Circle A warned me that there won't be a great deal of contrast between the frame colour and the logos, but that is fine with me; I am not going for a contrasty look. The lug cutouts (or "windows", if you will) will be painted the same gold as the logos, and I've also asked Circle A to do the lug outlining. I can do it myself, but their work will no doubt be nicer, plus it will match the other gold detailing exactly. Here is an example of a fancy outlining job they've done on another bike, but mine will be a toned down version.

So there it is. I think the paint and logos are done at this point and they are working on the lug outlining. I haven't seen pictures of the painted frame yet, but I am sure it's gorgeous. The anticipation is killing me!

31 comments:

  1. It's going to look great. Thanks for keeping us posted on the progress!

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  2. Nice update. As Mike said, thanks.

    Do you know what typeface is used for the downtube logo? It is very elegant.

    Any ETA for the painted frame?

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  3. It'll be done before you know it!

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  4. Thanks guys. The ETA is whenever either Royal H. or myself can pick it up. From a logical standpoint, I am not in a hurry, because I am not ready to build it up yet anyway - so it may as well chill out in Providence for a bit.

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  5. PS: not sure about the typeface, but will ask when I have a chance.

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  6. Isn't it great to feel like a kid waiting for Christmas to arrive even though the holiday is weeks past?

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  7. Velouria, that is going to be one gorgeous bicycle. I'm sage with envy.

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  8. Justine - well, my birthday is coming up so the timing is actually rather appropriate : )

    Thanks scootia and Vee.

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  9. Happy Birthday! I won't ask which one it is.

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  10. On the subject of head badges, this is what is says on the Rivendell website regarding theirs: "Our headbadges are made in Italy, Taiwan, and Rhode Island."

    Rhode Island is local, isn't it?

    I seem to recall a Reader article about their headbadge maker in Rhode Island. I don't remember; maybe it was mentioned on their website.

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  11. Aha, I found it. They use this company in Providence:

    http://www.hookfast.com/index.aspx

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  12. That's a lot of bicycle companies in one small island state. :)

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  13. i'm sure this frame is going to be phenomenally gorgeous once the paintwork is completed... can't wait to see the results!

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  14. Eric - Rhode Island qualifies as local, especially for me (which is why MDI just mercilessly made fun of it). That is funny that HookFast also makes Rivendell's headbadges! But I'm pretty sure they do bulk orders and that a one-off would be expensive. Happily I have just discovered that Shane Jordan (of bostonbiker.org) is a headbadge maker. It's amazing how many artisans live in the area.

    Justine - Thanks, it's still a week or so off. I will be 31 (gasp!).

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  15. Velouria, that is going to be one exquisite Mixte when it is finished. I love the art nouveau logos you have chosen and they will look great with your frame and its Lovely Lugs. That green bike in the link is a stunner too - amazing lugwork.

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  16. Just the thought of an art nouveau headbadge makes me very giddy with delight. Eventually, eventually...

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  17. Now the question is what colour tyres and what style of fenders to complete this frame...

    (I think cream & Honjo hammered+fluted, or else those unusual reproduction French ones that VO carries, what are they?)

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  18. velouria, will the frame be clearcoated over the logos and lug detailing?

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  19. expressionist woodblock headbadge make me happy. can't wait to see!

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  20. MDI-- are you referring to the new VO hammered fender? i don't quite like them, with that hexagonal pattern... maybe it is just the lighting in the photos, or maybe it is that they are highly polished, but they seem too "busy" compared with the square pattern of the honjos.

    on a really nice frame with lots of fine detail (such as this mixte will undoubtedly have), i would favor a simpler fluted fender over the hammered style.

    a really nice touch would be to paint fill the fender flutes with the frame color.

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  21. Somervillain - yes, I think it will be clearcoated over everything. The VO fenders I really like are the "Le Paon" fenders. Their new version of hammered ones is nice too, but I am generally not that crazy about hammered Honjos.

    I also prefer the classic fluted fenders on a mixte, but the major drawback to them is that they scratch fairly easily and the scratches are highly visible. I am hoping the Le Paons will solve that problem without looking as busy as the hammered fenders.

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  22. What about the smooth fluted Honjo fenders? They have nice ends that would match your lugs.

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  23. Giffen - I have those on my Motobecane mixte. They are beautiful, but scratches are very noticeable. Plus I'm curious about the Le Paon; I think they would be era-appropriate for the style I am going for with this bike.

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  24. "scratches" -- I thought the same thing at first, but don't the Le Paons have an even glossier finish?

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  25. The fluted start out as super glossy as well, and eventually the gloss wears down. I think the gloss is the same on all the fenders, but the difference is that on the Le Paon and the Hammered the surface is broken up into many tiny surfaces, making the scratches and dents hard to see - they blend into the design. The one big surface on the fluted makes them easy to see. The Co-Habitant has the hammered Honjos on his Motobecane, and he jokes that they come pre-dented.

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  26. Basic rule of thumb: If it's polished, it'll need polishing. If you're the sort that polishes compulsively, well there ya go; something to do.

    If you're the sort that lies in bed at night with the covers pulled up over your head because you swear you saw a polishing rag under it when you got in, well, perhaps some other finish is for you.

    But the fluted is really pretty. If I do the metal thang on the Peugeot mixte I'll be going with those, but since it's of the piebald variety Planet Bikes will look pretty sharp too.

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  27. The hammered Honjos can take a hammering and not look hammered... Hammer. :)

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  28. the thing to remember about any style of aluminum honjos is that they are made from plain, uncoated aluminum. the ones that have a high-polished finish *will* dull with time as the aluminum oxidizes, it's just a fact of life.

    the hammered honjos do indeed hide scratches very well-- mine came from the factory with fine scratches from the manufacturing process, but the hammered surface really masks them.

    the la paons are very retro looking and will look great on the mixte!

    if scratching (or dulling) is a concern, you mar want to consider going with stainless steel honjos. they are slightly heavier, but they will resist dulling, denting and scratching far better than aluminum.

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  29. I think the hammered fenders are certainly the most sensible version to get, and if you like the look there is no reason to even consider other models. My reason for seeking out other models is that I am not crazy about the hammered look (unusual, I know). After getting used to seeing it on the Co-Habitant's bike, I don't dislike it as much as I used to - but I still don't love it. And as somervillain said, I think they are most suitable for a clean and minimalist sort of bike - like the Co-Habitant's very simple silver Motobecane. On that bike, the hammered Honjos enhance the look of the frame. On either my vintage or my new mixte, they would probably compete with it. I am hoping that the Le Paons offer most of the advantage of the hammered finish but in a more subdued form.

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